Grange (@1.62) vs Shane O'Neills (@2.63)
06-10-2019

Our Prediction:

Grange will win

Grange – Shane O'Neills Match Prediction | 06-10-2019 11:00

Shane was inaugurated as the O'Neill. The case for Mathew's disqualifying status under both English and Irish law, as an affiliated member of the family rather than as an actual son of Conn Bacach,[16] was carefully stated by Shane when he made his own claim to the title of Earl of Tyrone both before and during his visit to Queen Elizabeth in 1562,[17] and restated in some detail by the English authorities when Hugh O'Neill was outlawed during the Nine Years War. In English law this was an illegal usurpation of the rulership of Ulster. But according to Gaelic Irish law (derbfine), Shane had every claim to be chief of the name.

There, by premeditated treachery or in a sudden brawl, he was slain by the MacDonnells. The English invaded Donegal and restored ODonnell. This victory strengthened Shane ONeills position, but the English made preparations for his subjugation. Attended by a small body of retainers and taking his prisoner Sorley Boy with him, he presented himself among the MacDonnells near Cushendun, on the Antrim coast. Shane then turned his hand against the MacDonnells, claiming that he was serving the Queen of England in harrying the Scots. He fought an indecisive battle with Sorley Boy MacDonnell near Coleraine in 1564, and in 1565 he routed the MacDonnells and took Sorley Boy prisoner near Ballycastle. ONeill was routed by the ODonnells at Letterkenny; and seeking safety in flight, he threw himself on the mercy of his enemies, the MacDonnells.

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4, 1562. Accompanied by Ormonde and Kildare he reached London on Jan. Elizabeth, who was not prepared to undertake the subjugation of the Irish chieftain, urgently desired peace with him, especially when the devastation of his territory by Sussex brought him no nearer to submission. Sussex was not supported by the queen, who sent the Earl of Kildare to arrange terms with Shane. Elizabeth temporized; but finding that Shane was in danger of becoming a tool in the hands of Spanish intriguers, she permitted him to return to Ireland, recognizing him as the ONeill, and chieftain of Tyrone. The latter agreed to present himself before Elizabeth.

Marching north at unprecedented speed, the O'Neill surprised the MacDonnells, who had expected him to intervene against an incursion by James MacDonnell of Dunnyveg's own household troops who had landed in Lecale. In turning his hand against the MacDonnells, Shane O'Neill claimed that he was serving the Queen of England in harrying the Scots. While James MacDonnell of Dunnyveg and his brothers rapidly assembled an army in Scotland, the O'Neill defeated Sorley Boy MacDonnell's local levies at Knockboy above Broughshane, crossed the Antrim mountains by way of Clogh and after burning James's new castle at Redbay, pursued the remains of Sorley's army and the recently landed army under James to the neighbourhood of Ballycastle, where he routed the MacDonnells at the Battle of Glentasie and took Sorley's and his badly wounded brother James prisoner. He fought an indecisive battle with Sorley Boy MacDonnell near Coleraine in 1564, and the following Easter hosted his entire army at Feadan above Newry.

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Piers travelled to Cushendun to take Shane's head and send it to Dublin Castle. The English Government tried to pass this off as a "drunken brawl" turned savage. His body was possibly later moved to Glenarm Abbey. Here, on 2 June 1567, he was killed by the MacDonnells, and his headless body was buried at Crosskern Church at Ballyterrim above Cushendun. Unbeknownst to Shane, The Scots had already come to an agreement with Henry Sidney and William Piers, Seneschal of Clandeboye, commander of the English garrison at Carrickfergus. Attended by a small body of gallowglass, and taking his prisoner Sorley Boy with him, he presented himself among the MacDonnells near Cushendun, on the Antrim coast, hoping to propose an alliance. Failing in an attempt to arrange terms, and also in obtaining the help which he solicited from France, the O'Neill was utterly routed by the O'Donnells again at the battle of Farsetmore near Letterkenny; and seeking safety in flight, he threw himself on the mercy of his enemies, the MacDonnells.

Although the O'Neill had allied himself against the English with the Scottish MacDonnell clan, who had settled in Antrim, Queen Elizabeth I, on succeeding to the English throne in 1558, was inclined to come to terms with the O'Neill, who after his father's death functioned as de facto head of the dynasty. O'Neill refused to put himself in the power of Sussex without a guarantee for his safety; and so Elizabeth decided to establish Brian in his place. She accordingly agreed to recognise his claims to the lordship, throwing over Brian O'Neill, son of the assassinated Feardorcha, Baron of Dungannon, if the O'Neill would submit to her authority and that of her deputy.

During this visit Shane's legal claim to his father Conn Bacach's earldom was verbally confirmed and Shane was led to believe that he would be recognised as the 2nd Earl of Tyrone, though some reservation was made of the possible future rights of Hugh O'Neill, who had succeeded his brother Brian as Baron of Dungannon. However, confirmation of the grant of the earldom was never delivered, and the O'Neill was compelled to defend his hegemony in Ulster when his onetime supporter Sir Henry Sidney was appointed Lord Deputy and resurrected Sussex's policy of undermining the O'Neill's authority. Brian had been killed in a skirmish in April 1562 by Shane's Tanaiste, Turlough Luineach O'Neill.

Gaelic football[edit]

J. The nickname "Shane the Proud" (Irish: Sen an Domais), which appears in nineteenth and early twentieth century popular histories, was coined some time after his death by English writers, and originally had the pejorative meaning of "arrogant", because they wished to portray him as vain, self-indulgent and ruthless, and thus undermine the legitimacy of his claim to the earldom of Tyrone.[6]Holinshed's Chronicles of 1587, for instance, had a side-note, "The proud taunts of Shane O'neile", the text remarking that "when the commissioners were sent to intreat with him vpon sundrie points, they found him most arrogant & out of all good order, braieng out speches not met nor semelie."[7] Later Irish writers, such as John Mitchel and P.

Unable to succeed against O'Neill in battle, Sussex tried in 1561 to assassinate him using poisoned wine. The O'Neill now called the lord deputy to account for his unnatural enmity, as displayed in this most recent of many attempts on his life. The O'Neill destroyed the greater part of Sussex's invasion army at the Battle of the Red Sagums, 18 July 1561, while Sussex was deep in O'Neill-controlled territory garrisoning Armagh with a small body of men. Afterwards Elizabeth sent the Earl of Kildare to arrange terms with the O'Neill, who was demanding a complete withdrawal of the English from his territory.

Two of his sons became tanists to Turlough Luineach in his attempts to neutralise Hugh, Earl of Tyrone. Shane was succeeded as the O'Neill by his tainiste, Turlough Luineach O'Neill who married Shane's lover, Agnes Campbell, a natural daughter of Archibald Campbell, 4th Earl of Argyll some months after the assassination. The Bishop of Clogher, Miler Magrath, said "the people[ of Ulster] adhere to the MacShanes, whom they consider the true branch of Conn Bacach's line", but with their arch-enemy Hugh O'Neill, 2nd Earl of Tyrone, entering into warfare with the outbreak of the Nine Years' War the MacShanes were compelled to support Hugh's enemy, the Dublin administration, and their support in Tyrone withered.

Early life[edit]

Shane O'Neill (Irish: Sen Mac Cuinn Nill; c. This brought him into conflict with competing branches of the O'Neill family and with the English government in Ireland, who recognised a rival claim. Shanes's support was considered worth gaining by the English even during the lifetime of his father Conn O'Neill, 1st Earl of Tyrone (died 1559). 1530 2 June 1567), was an Irish chieftain of the O'Neill dynasty of Ulster in the mid 16th century. Shane O'Neill's career was marked by his ambition to be The O'Neill sovereign of the dominant O'Neill family of Tr Eoghainand thus overlord of the entire province. But rejecting overtures from Thomas Radclyffe, 3rd Earl of Sussex, the lord deputy from 1556, Shane refused to help the English against the Scottish settlers on the coast of Antrim, allying himself instead with the MacDonnells, the most powerful of these immigrants.

Arthur and Dan Gibson went on to represent County Antrim. It is situated in the outskirts of Glenarm village in Feystown and has over 100 members. Antrim GAA has a Gaelic football club named in his honour, Shane O'Neill's GFC, founded by the solicitor and antiquarian Francis Joseph Bigger. Shane O'Neill's hurling club was the first official GAA club in Glenarm, founded in 1903 using land donated by the Gibson family of the Libbert, Glenarm. There is also a Shane O'Neill's GAC in Camloch, County Armagh.