Loughgall (@1.57) vs H & W Welders (@4.1)
05-10-2019

Our Prediction:

Loughgall will win

Loughgall – H & W Welders Match Prediction | 05-10-2019 10:00

It took place on the night of 5/6 May 1976 near Cornamucklagh, a townland just inside the Cooley Peninsula in the north of County Louth in the Republic of Ireland, when the Irish Army and Garda Sochna arrested eight British Special Air Service soldiers who had illegally crossed the Irish border. The Flagstaff Hill incident was an international incident between the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom.

O'Donnell had been released without charges for possession of weapons on two different occasions in the past.[39] Whereas the previous ambushes of IRA men had been well planned by Special Forces, the Clonoe killings owed much to a series of mistakes by the IRA men in question. Two IRA men escaped from the scene, but the four named above were killed. Another four IRA members were killed in an ambush in February 1992. A support vehicle further compromised the getaway by flashing its emergency lights. The IRA men were intercepted by the SAS as they were trying to dump the lorry and escape in cars in the car park of Clonoe Roman Catholic church, whose roof was set on fire by Army flares. After the shooting they drove past the house of Tony Doris, the IRA man killed the previous year, where they fired more shots in the air and were heard to shout, "Up the 'RA, that's for Tony Doris". They had mounted a heavy DShK machine gun on the back of a stolen lorry, driven right to the RUC/British Army station and opened fire with tracer ammunition at the fortified base at point-blank range, when the long-range of the weapon would enable them to fire from a safe distance. No efforts were made to conceal the firing position or the machine gun. The four, Peter Clancy, Kevin Barry O'Donnell, Sean O'Farrell and Patrick Vincent, were killed at Clonoe after an attack on the RUC station in Coalisland. The six attackers gathered on the same spot, instead of vanishing separately.

At about the same time, the unit's commander James Lynagh was spotted in the town, suggesting the van might be used in the attack.[16] The digger (a backhoe loader) was taken from a farm at Lislasly Road, about two miles west of Loughgall. At the same time, another team would arrive in a van and open fire on the base,[3] with the aim of killing the three RUC officers as they came off duty.[18] Both teams would then leave the area in the van.[3] To avoid security checkpoints, the bomb was ferried by boat across Lough Neagh, from Ardboe to Maghery.[19] The van and digger that would be used were hijacked in the hours leading up to the attack.[3] The van, a blue Toyota HiAce, was stolen by masked men from a business in Dungannon. Two IRA members stayed at the farm to stop the owners raising the alarm. One team was to drive a digger with a bomb in its bucket through the base's perimeter fence and light the fuse. The IRA's attack involved two teams. Declan Arthurs drove the digger, while two others drove ahead of him in a scout car.

A Garda Sochna officer stated that the bridge was at least half in the Republic, and the British Army officer on the scene disputed this. The Irish Army then deployed a unit of soldiers and its commander, armed with a submachine gun, demanded that the British Army surrender their explosives. A British patrol was laying explosive charges to destroy the bridge, as part of an effort to destroy bridges and roads being used by the Provisional IRA to import arms and supplies from the Republic of Ireland into Northern Ireland. On 28 October 1971, a confrontation took place between British and Irish troops at a cross-border bridge between the Republic and Northern Ireland, at the village of Munnelly, between counties Fermanagh and Monaghan.

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The security forces recovered eight IRA firearms from the scene: three H&K G3 rifles, one FN FAL rifle, two FN FNC rifles, a Franchi SPAS-12T shotgun and a Ruger Security-Six revolver.

It thinks it can defeat them. Thousands of people attended their funerals, the biggest republican funerals in Northern Ireland since those of the IRA hunger strikers of 1981.[30]Gerry Adams, in his graveside oration, gave a speech stating the British Government understood that it could buy off the government of the Republic of Ireland, which he described as the "shoneen clan" (that is, Anglophile), but added "it does not understand the Jim Lynaghs, the Pdraig McKearneys or the Samus McElwaines. The IRA members killed in the ambush became known as the "Loughgall Martyrs" among IRA supporters.[29] The men's relatives considered their deaths to be part of a deliberate shoot-to-kill policy by the security forces.

Three local RUC officers worked at the station, which was only open part-time, from 9 AM to 11 AM, and from 5 PM to 7 PM daily. On the day of the attack, two RUC Headquarters Mobile Support Unit (HMSU) officers were placed in the station to accompany the local RUC officer who was to carry on the normal running of the station.[4][1] The HMSU was the RUC's equivalent of the SAS.

An Phoblacht claimed the IRA men thwarted an ambush and at least two SAS members were killed.[31] A second shooting took place in the village of Pomeroy on 28 June, this time against British regular troops. On 24 March 1990, there was a gun battle between an IRA unit and undercover British forces at the village of Cappagh, County Tyrone, in which IRA members fired at a civilian-type car driven by security forces, according to Archie Hamilton, then Secretary of State for Defence.[30] Hamilton stated that there were no security or civilian casualties. One soldier was seriously wounded.[32] In October 1990, two IRA volunteers from the brigade (Dessie Grew and Martin McCaughey) were shot dead near Loughgall by SAS undercover members while allegedly collecting two rifles from an IRA arms dump.

The shotgun drew the attention of the Garda since the same type of weapon was used in three recent murders in the area. If the roles were reversed we would let you go back. We are all doing the one bloody job", but he eventually ordered his men to surrender their weapons after Irish Army soldiers surrounded both cars and aimed rifles at them.[10] The Garda unit, commanded by Sergeant Pat McLoughlin, radioed his superiors for instructions on how to deal with the men now in custody. Rees and Nicholson were still wearing British Army uniforms. When the soldiers manning the surveillance post failed to meet Ligari and Lawson, they radioed their base at Bessbrook Mill. The Omeath Garda station was ordered to keep the men in custody until a decision was taken at a Governmental level in Dublin. The second cara Vauxhall Victor with Burchell and Rhodeswas stopped shortly after. Initially, an IRA ambush was suspected. Four plain-clothes SAS soldierstroopers Nial McClean, Vincent Thompson, Nigel Burchell and Carsten Rhodeswere sent to search for their missing comrades in two cars, picking up the two men from the observation post in the process.[10] The team was carrying another three Sterling submachine-guns, a Remington pump-action shotgun and 222 rounds of ammunition.[12] The first vehicle a Hillman Avenger carrying Thompson, McClean, Rees and Nicholson - drove up to the Garda checkpoint at 2:05 am. Sergeant Rees tried to explain the situation to the Garda: "Let us go back.

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The second was an attack on an RUC base at The Birches on 11 August 1986. Members of the unit, such as Jim Lynagh and Pdraig McKearney, advocated a strategy of destroying bases and preventing them being rebuilt or repaired in an attempt to "deny ground" to British forces.[10][11] In 1985, Patrick Joseph Kelly became its commander and began implementing the strategy. In both attacks, the bases were raked with machine-gun fire and then severely damaged with homemade bombs. In 1985 and 1986, it carried out two major attacks on Royal Ulster Constabulary bases.[12] The first was an attack on the RUC barracks in Ballygawley on 7 December 1985, in which two police officers were shot dead. By the mid-1980s it had become one of the IRA's most aggressive formations. The IRA's East Tyrone Brigade was active mainly in eastern County Tyrone and neighbouring parts of County Armagh.